An article in The Times

This summer, Dame Fiona Reynolds agreed to sit for the Environment Series Heads and there are two new sittings planned with the founders of Common Ground, starting in November. I am now trying to identify a good location for the exhibition of these heads. I have several works at a joint show at Newport House, Herefordshire October 12-26th. My winter carving project proceeds – RSPB Pulborough Brooks plays host to the 3 tonne block of limestone which I am carving once a week, most often on Saturday mornings should you ever find yourself passing through West Sussex. The move of … Continue reading An article in The Times

Can YOU name a new landmark?

A new sculpture sits on the course of the former A3 separating the National Trust’s Hindhead Common and Devil’s Punch Bowl, GU26 6AB, following a snowy launch on 23rd March. During the course of the final 10 days working, lots of words started to come to me but none quite seemed to fit a final name. A sculpture may speak to you as viewer in an entirely different way to me as creator – and so it seems a fun idea to see how others will view the piece, be they the children associated with the project, locals, or those … Continue reading Can YOU name a new landmark?

A newly discovered Roman Sculpture – the Fittleworth Iphigenia

This newly published paper tells the intriguing story of an important, newly discovered Roman sculpture. Click here to open (it is a 1mb file so may take a few seconds to access the archive); scroll down past the frontispiece page 1 to access the text and images on pages 2-8. A New Sculpture of Iphigenia in Tauris E. Black, J. Edgar, K.M.J. Hayward and M. Henig (2012). Britannia, Volume 43, November 2012 pp 243-249 Continue reading A newly discovered Roman Sculpture – the Fittleworth Iphigenia

A contemporary search for Petworth Marble (or Winklestone)

In the early 1800s, Petworth Marble rivalled many of the stones which were routinely imported from the continent, in both beauty and quality. A kind of shell marble occurring in the Wealden clay at Petworth, its quarrying was concentrated on the Egremont estate at Kirdford and there are accounts of industry at Plaistow. Also called Sussex marble, it was used in several chimney pieces at Petworth House and further afield at Westminster Abbey in Edward the Confessor’s Chapel, the tomb of Edward III and of Richard II and his Queen are both in “grey Petworth Marble” (The Saturday Magazine Supplement, … Continue reading A contemporary search for Petworth Marble (or Winklestone)

Leonora Carrington on intellectualising art

It is sad to hear Leonora Carrington has died aged 94. Her recent sculpture (in the link, seen here in the exhibition which she lived long enough to see open), is seemingly interpreted from the imagery of her earlier paintings. For me, it does not have the power of her two-dimensional work or earliest sculpture. Nevertheless, for the British artist who lived in Mexico City for sixty years and was adopted as one of their own, there appears to have been a growing demand for it. The Guardian journalist Joanna Moorhead is a relative of Carrington. She produced a touching film which was … Continue reading Leonora Carrington on intellectualising art

Smooth, yet not complete

One perennial issue with clay sculpture seems to be the pre-occupation with the smooth – perhaps aimed at some form of ‘finish’ – with less attention to the completeness of the sculptural form or plane, by which I mean where the surface should attempt to be visually consistent – read as one – in whatever texture or idiom is used. A shiny rubber ball is a smooth, complete sphere. A single  compound curved plane exists – a simple and yet complex sculpture. An orange’s form is relatively complete whilst not being overly smooth. Its surface has a regularity in its irregularities that … Continue reading Smooth, yet not complete